Missing the Movies  

Missing the movies

Post by Elizabeth B. 

Hello, dear friends and patrons! Have you been enjoying all of these excellent new movies? I have. So far this spring, I’ve been to the theater four times. That may not sound like a lot to you, but considering that I average maybe two movie trips a year, I’m alarmingly ahead of schedule. And so I’m discovering for the first time the problem with finding new favorite movies while they’re still in theaters: You can’t re-watch them five times in a row. I guess you can, if you’re willing to sacrifice your paycheck to the popcorn stand! But, as your friendly neighborhood librarian, I’m here to help you satisfy your cravings on the cheap. Here’s a list of books that make great companions for the latest, greatest blockbusters: 

If you liked "Black Panther":  

Try "Children of Blood and Bone" by Tomi Adeyemi! 

I know. You were expecting me to recommend the Black Panther comics, right? Yes, the latest comic books by Roxane Gay, Nnedi Okorafor, and Ta Nehisi-Coates are excellent, and you should definitely read them! But just telling you the names of the comics felt like cheating. 

"Children of Blood and Bone" starts with a staff fight worthy of the Dora Milaje, and it just gets more intense from there. Follow headstrong Zélie and compassionate Princess Amari as they try to restore magic and freedom to their kingdom, while rule-following Prince Iman endeavors to stop them. This story is steeped in Yoruba mythology, tackles oppression in between epic action scenes, and is being made into a movie!  

Other Options: Check out Alaya Dawn Johnson’s "The Summer Prince" for stylish technology worthy of Shuri’s lab and "Between the World and Me" by Ta Nehisi-Coates for the first book in T’Challa’s and Nakia’s new book club that I just made up, “Bringing Wakandan Justice to the World.” 

If you liked "A Wrinkle in Time": 

Try "Akata Witch and Akata Warrior" by Nnedi Okorafor! Sunny, like Meg Murry, is a brilliant misfit who faces bullying at school and struggles to find acceptance. When her friends drag her into a world full of magic, Sunny discovers that her weaknesses are actually part of what make her magical. Nnedi Okorafor’s emphasis on smarts and self-love match perfectly with A Wrinkle in Time’s clever protagonist, and these mischievous teens will endear themselves to you just like Meg, Charles, and Calvin.  

Other Options: "The Binti" novels, also by Nnedi Okorafor, are adult sci-fi full of math-y, interplanetary goodness! If you prefer magic spells to mathematical equations, check out Tahereh Mafi’s "Furthermore", about an outcast girl who must save her father in a strange fantasy land. 

If you liked "Love, Simon":  

Try All Out: "The No-Longer-Secret Stories of Queer Teens Throughout the Ages", ed. by Saundra Mitchell.

There’s a scene in Love, Simon where our narrator imagines what the world would be like if straight wasn’t the default. In "All Out", Simon wouldn’t have to imagine: these stories present a range of queer stories: lesbian, bisexual, gay, and transgender teenagers, from the 1300s to 1999. Sure, Simon couldn’t write emails to any of them, but at least he could have new stories to reimagine. 

Other Options: Did you spot Adam Silvera’s "More Happy Than Not" tucked into the corner of Simon’s bookshelf? You and Simon can read the same books! Of course, Simon will probably read even more great books in Becky Albertalli’s upcoming sequel to her movie-inspiring novel. "Leah on the Offbeat" focuses on Simon’s best friend Leah: her sexuality, her family, her friends, and her amazing artistic talents. It comes out on April 24. 

If you liked "Ready, Player One":  

Try "Warcross" by Marie Lu! Like Ready, Player One’s hero, hacker Emika Chen spends her days plugged into a virtual reality video game. Unlike Wade, though, Emika’s not there for fun or puzzle-solving: she’s a bounty hunter who’s desperately trying to make ends meet. When Emika gets offered a job as an undercover spy, complete with money and fame, she takes it, but her new position plunges her into a dangerous conflict about the video game’s future. 

Other Options: If you like 80’s nostalgia more than video games, Brian K. Vaughan’s "Paper Girls" might be for you. This comic about four teens who get swept up into a time-traveling alien invasion has all of the action and wonder of a Steven Spielberg movie.  

Now it's your turn! What movies have you loved lately? Post your suggested book companion in the comments. 
Happy reading! 

Posted by behrhart@auroragov.org On 04 April, 2018 at 4:10 PM  1 Comment

Comments
<a href="https://www.google.com/">Google</a> (Guest) said On 10 April, 2018 at 3:05 PM
I've read the book and really enjoyed it.  
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