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DATE: May 2, 2018

CONTACT: Sergeant Diana Cooley  
(303) 432-5095

NATURE: 2018 Fallen Police Officer Memorial

The Chief of Police would like to announce the Aurora Police Department’s 2018 Fallen Police Officer Memorial. We will be honoring the lives of the following Aurora Police Officers who died in the line of duty:

Patrolwoman Debra Sue Corr EOW 6/27/81

Patrolman Thomas Dietzman Jr. EOW 8/16/85

Agent Edward Hockom EOW 9/21/87

Agent Michael Del Thomas EOW 9/30/06

Police Officer Doug Byrne EOW 3/26/07

Additionally, we will be honoring the lives of all of the Colorado Fallen Officers that have died in the line of duty since May of 2017 which include:

Douglas County Sheriff’s Office Zackari Spurlock Parrish, III EOW 12/31/17

Adams County Sheriff’s Office Heath McDonald Gumm EOW 01/24/18

El Paso County Sheriff’s Office Micah Lee Flick EOW 02/05/18

The public, law enforcement agencies and families of the fallen, as well as media are invited to attend this ceremony. The ceremony will include the Aurora Police Honor Guard, Smoky Hill High school Choir singing the National Anthem, and a Blue Rose Presentation by Brotherhood for the Fallen.

The ceremony will take place on Wednesday May 2, 2018 at 11:45 a.m. until approximately 12:30 p.m. in the Memorial Courtyard of the Aurora Municipal Center (AMC) Campus.

The media is asked to contact Sergeant Diana Cooley at dcooley@auroragov.org if they are planning on attending. Interviews will be provided at the end of the ceremony.
Posted by dcooley@auroragov.org  On Apr 30, 2018 at 8:01 AM
  
On May 12th, a pedestrian succumbed to serious injuries after a traffic collision that occurred on May 10th, 2018, at approximately 3:38 pm.

Aurora police officers responded to the area of East 6th avenue and Peoria street on the report of a traffic collision involving a vehicle and a pedestrian. The pedestrian was transported by ambulance to University Hospital with serious injuries. The name of the pedestrian is not being released at this time.

Alcohol and speed do not appear to be factors in this collision. The driver remained at the scene. Several witnesses indicted that the pedestrian was in a crosswalk but crossing against a red signal light and possibly using a cell phone however; this collision is still under investigation.


Officer Kevin Deichsel
Aurora Police Traffic Section
303-739-6373
Posted by kdeichse@auroragov.org  On May 13, 2018 at 10:55 AM
  
This morning on April 21, 2018 at approximately 2:34 A.M., Aurora Police Officers responded to an automotive repair shop, located at 9230 East Colfax Avenue. Officers responded to this location on the report of a burglary in-progress, where a suspect was observed inside the business by live-feed security cameras.

As officers arrived, they observed an adult male suspect inside of the business. The officers could see that the male was suffering from apparent injuries. Officers entered the business and found the male to be armed with a lethal cutting instrument. In the presence of Officers, the male began to inflict injury to himself with the cutting instrument. As Officers approached the male, who was still armed with the cutting instrument, officers gave verbal orders and attempted to de-escalate the situation. The suspect then threatened officers with the weapon and officers responded by utilizing less lethal options that were available. These less lethal options proved to be ineffective and the suspect then resumed inflicting injuries to himself. The suspect then retreated and barricaded himself in another room inside of the business. In this room, Officers ultimately found the male to be unresponsive. He was transported to an area hospital where he was pronounced deceased.

During this incident, Officers showed great restraint and no duty weapons were fired. Because of the nature of the circumstances and because officers used less lethal force, the Aurora Police Department’s Major Crimes/Homicide Unit responded to resume the investigation. Per Colorado Senate Bill 217, the Denver Police Department also responded to assist our Detectives in their efforts.

The Arapahoe County Coroner’s Office will conduct an autopsy of the male to determine the manner in which he died. The Coroner will also identify the decedent pending positive identification and the notification of next of kin.

If anybody has information relating to this incident, please contact Detective Warren Miller at (303) 739-6117.

The investigation is in on-going and in its early stages and therefore no further information is available.

Officer Bill Hummel
Public Information Officer
Media Relations Unit
(303) 432-5095
Posted by whummel@auroragov.org  On Apr 21, 2018 at 8:50 AM
  
UPDATE: The Aurora Police Major Crimes/Homicide Unit has made an arrest of Cleveland Grimes (DOB 03/10/1982) in connection with the homicide that occurred on April 14, 2018 at 940 South Iola Street. Grimes, who is pictured below, was arrested for First Degree Murder.

The case is now in the hands of the 18th Judicial District and therefore further public inquiries into the details of the case will be referred to their organization.

If you have any information in regards to this incident, please contact Detective Todd Fredericksen at (303) 739-6106.

Grimes

Sergeant Chris Neiman
Public Information Officer
Media Relations Unit
(720) 432-5095



Information Previously Released on April 14, 2018


In the early hours of April 14, 2018 at approximately 4:30 A.M., Aurora Police Officers responded to 940 S. Iola St. on the report of an unknown problem. A report to dispatch indicated that a female was in distress at this approximate location.

As Officers arrived, they located 2 adult females associated with a vehicle that was near the above address. One of the females was suffering from an apparent gunshot wound and both females were subsequently transported to area hospitals. The female who was suffering from a gunshot wound sadly succumbed to her injuries and was pronounced deceased at the hospital. The other female was treated for minor injuries and is expected to survive. It is unknown what circumstances lead up to the shooting incident but answering that question will be a focus for investigators as the investigation progresses. There is currently not a suspect in custody in connection with this incident

Detectives do not have any additional information that is available for public release at this time because they wish to protect the active investigation in its early stages. The identity of the victim will be released by the Arapahoe County Coroner’s Office at a later date pending the notification of next of kin.

The Aurora Police Major Crimes/Homicide unit is handling the investigation into this matter. We are asking anybody with information about this incident to please call Detective Fredericksen at (303) 739-6106. Tipsters can also remain anonymous and be eligible for a reward of up to $2,000 by calling Metro Denver Crime Stoppers at (720) 913-7867.

Officer Bill Hummel
Public Information Officer
Media Relations Unit
(720) 432-5095
Posted by whummel@auroragov.org  On Apr 20, 2018 at 9:03 AM
  

Blog pic

Post by Steven K 

If you’re intrigued by anything you read below, join us at APL Central on Saturday, May 26th at 3:00pm for a journey into the world of Arrakis, the setting of Frank Herbert’s award-winning science fiction novel, Dune.


2018 has been an interesting year for me. So far, I’ve witnessed a half-orphaned teenager dismantle a planetary trade empire and start a holy war. I helped another teenager free the solar system from a brutal socially-stratified imperial regime. When I finished that, I traversed a glacier on an icy alien planet with an exiled politician who could change his (her? their?) biological sex. And when I got bored, I watched in awe as two star-crossed lovers stole a magic gem from an evil god. Oh, and I’ve spent 20 hours a week working at Aurora Public Library, which is often just as exciting.

I’ve obviously only done one of those things since the start of the year. (Mars is beautiful in February, by the way.)  Still, I have experienced all of those adventures secondhand from the comfort of my own couch. Truly, books are gateways to other worlds. If Worldbuildersyou read, you can live thousands of different lives in a single lifetime. You can live vicariously through other characters’ lives—you know, get a feel for what it’s like to rule a fledgling empire or brush shoulders with your fellow wizards at a school of magic. You can travel on the cheap to exotic locales, to the past and the future, to universes with different natural laws and wildly different living things. Reading grants you all these freedoms and more, all for the cost of a few hours (or days) of your time and a few bucks (or for free, if you use the library!).  

Yes, books are marvelous gateways, but even novice readers will tell you that some of these gateways are better than others.

 

Say what you want about genre, or historicity, or style or form—I won’t argue with you there. Personally, I prefer science fiction and fantasy, but wonders can be found throughout the literary landscape. Regardless of category, the best books are those that feel real and ring true. There are many ways to accomplish these goals, but I’m particularly fond of one strategy: worldbuilding.

All writers worldbuild, whether they’re writing something realistic or fantastic, modern or historical, mysterious or romantic. Simply put, worldbuilding is what writers do to give their settings depth, richness, and complexity. The goal: to make you, the reader, feelWOrldbuilders like you could climb inside those worlds and really live there, instead of feeling like they’re cheap amusement park rides or half-hearted high school productions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. It’s an exercise in immersion, an effort to make you momentarily forget about the real world and transport your mind elsewhere.

 

So, how exactly does a writer achieve this effect? I would argue that effective worldbuilding happens on two distinct levels: the small-scale and the large-scale. On the small-scale, worlds are built from careful, detailed descriptions of places, people, things, and actions. Cumulatively, all of these descriptions conjure up images in our mind’s eye, essentially transmuting black and white pages into rich canvases full of light and color and texture. It’s as close to magic as mere mortals can get. Take, for example, the opening passage to the final book of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy:

In a valley shaded with rhododendrons, close to the snow line, where a stream milky with meltwater splashed and where doves and linnets flew among the immense pines, lay a cave, half-hidden by the crag above and the stiff heavy leaves that clustered below.

WorldbuildersThe woods were full of sound: the stream between the rocks, the wind among the needles of the pine branches, the chitter of insects and the cries of small arboreal mammals, as well as the birdsong; and from time to time a stronger gust of wind would make one of the branches of a cedar or a fir move against another and groan like a cello.


It was a place of brilliant sunlight, never undappled. Shafts of lemon-gold brilliance lanced down to the forest floor between bars and pools of brown-green shade; and the light was never still, never constant, because drifting mist would often float among the treetops, filtering all the sunlight to a pearly sheen and brushing every pine cone with moisture that glistened when the mist lifted. Sometimes the wetness in the clouds condensed into tiny drops half mist and half rain, which floated downward rather than fell, making a soft rustling patter among the millions of needles. (The Amber Spyglass, 2000, p. 1)

The passage continues for several more pages, but I don’t want to spoil it for you. What I do want is to draw attention to its vivid imagery, both visual and aural. It’s absolutely arresting. Every time I read it I feel like I’m in that forested valley, a valley that’s alive and breathing, and it almost aches when I’m snapped back into the reality of the concrete jungle, which somehow seems dead in comparison despite its endless racket. Pullman is a gifted small-scale worldbuilder; you’ll find passages like this throughout his work.

Large-scale worldbuilding is harder to define—so I’ll let another master of the craft explain it for me. In his landmark essay “On Fairy-Stories,” J. R. R. Tolkien—creator of our beloved Middle-earth—puts it like this:

What really happens is that the story-maker proves a successful “sub-creator.” He makes a Secondary World which your mind 

Worldbuilderscan enter. Inside it, what he relates is “true”: it accords with the laws of that world. You therefore believe it, while you are, as it were, inside. (p. 351)

For Tolkien, large-scale worldbuilding is an act of “sub-creation.” Though he’d never have put it this way (on account of his staunch Roman Catholic beliefs), it’s as if the “story-maker” is the god of its own little universe—and as such, it must ensure that universe is whole and balanced, that everything in it “accords with the laws of that world.” In this regard, writers working with realistic fiction have a pretty good template to work with, so long as they’re keen observers of society and the natural world. But for writers of speculative fiction—especially science fiction and fantasy—this is where the fun begins.

Imagine that you are the sub-creator god of your own secondary world. Think of the power and freedom! You’re not bound by the limitations of our universe, though your world still needs that Tolkienian “inner consistency of reality.” What would you create? What novelties or magics or technologies would you introduce into your world? What environments would you construct, what beings would you populate them with, and by what processes would you have them interact? What do your world’s inhabitants eat, Worldbuilderswhere do they live, what do they value, what do they fear? Where have they been, historically, and what’s just over the horizon? In the end, the accomplished worldbuilder needs to be part scientist, part historian, part engineer, and part anthropologist, just to name a few other roles aside from “writer.” I know it’s a lot—but it’s not easy playing god.

Maybe you’d worldbuild like Tolkien: set your story in an environment similar to continental Europe, with a few notable exceptions (*cough* Mordor); design separate species/races of sentient life with different lifestyles and mortalities—elves, dwarves, humans, hobbits, ents, orcs, etc.; incorporate a mysterious “soft” system of magic available only to certain powerful beings; make the primary source of conflict a perpetual struggle between the forces of good and evil, where the good seeks harmony, freedom, and beauty and the evil seeks control, domination, and destruction; and so on.

Or maybe that’s too old school for your taste and you want to go the way of Pierce Brown’s Red Rising saga: set your world in a future version of our very own solar system, in which humans have colonized the planets and their moons with advanced technology; make your society rigidly hierarchical—where some people are born to rule, some to pilot starships, some to entertain,WB and others to toil endlessly to support everyone else—and reinforce that hierarchy with genetic engineering; sow the seeds of rebellion and interplanetary war by having your ruling class brutally enforce their Romanesque social order, whether by ordering executions for petty offenses or reducing entire moons to ash for perceived acts of treason.

Maybe you just want to make some maps or draw landscapes from a world that’s been plaguing your dreams.

 

Whatever it may be, if anything about worldbuilding interests you, join us for Worldbuilders! Our next meeting will be on Saturday, May 26th at 3:00pm in the small community room at APL Central. You can register hereto guarantee a spot. We’ll be talking about Frank Herbert’s legendary science fiction novel, Dune, but feel free to bring some of your original work to share, too.

I hope to see you there!

References:

Pullman, Philip. The Amber Spyglass. New York: Yearling, 2000.

Tolkien, J. R. R. “On Fairy-Stories.” Tales from the Perilous Realm. Ed. Christopher Tolkien. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2008. 315-400.

Posted by behrhart@auroragov.org  On May 17, 2018 at 12:44 PM
  
Aurora Police Department’s K9 Magnum has received a bullet and stab protective vest thanks to a charitable donation from non-profit organization Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. The vest was sponsored by an Anonymous Sponsor and embroidered with the sentiment “In memory of Mark Smith”.

Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. is a 501c(3) charity located in East Taunton, MA whose mission is to provide bullet and stab protective vests and other assistance to dogs of law enforcement and related agencies throughout the United States. The non-profit was established in 2009 to assist law enforcement agencies with this potentially lifesaving body armor for their four-legged K9 officers. Since its inception, Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provided over 2,900 protective vests in 50 states, through private and corporate donations, at a value of $5.7 million dollars.

The program is open to dogs actively employed in the U.S. with law enforcement or related agencies who are certified and at least 20 months of age. New K9 graduates, as well as K9s with expired vests, are eligible to participate.

The donation to provide one protective vest for a law enforcement K9 is $950.00. Each vest has a value between $1,744 – $2,283, and a five-year warranty and an average weight of 4-5 lbs. There is an estimated 30,000 law enforcement K9s throughout the United States. For more information or to learn about volunteer opportunities, please call 508-824-6978. Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provides information, lists events, and accepts tax-deductible donations of any denomination at www.vik9s.org or mailed to P.O. Box 9 East Taunton, MA 02718.


K-9 Magnum
Posted by kforrest@auroragov.org  On May 12, 2018 at 1:06 PM
  
UPDATE: The second day of the event being held on Friday, April 27 has been cancelled due to the closure of all Aurora Public Schools.  The video will be presented to Junior and Seniors in their classrooms next week.

Officer Kenneth Forrest
Public Information Officer
Media Relations Unit
(720) 432-5095
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Information Previously Released on April 22, 2018

Local Organizations Host “Every 15 Minutes” Program at Rangeview High School

Two-day simulation to educate students on the dangers of drinking and driving

WHO: Aurora Police Department (PIO: Kenneth Forrest 720-432-5095)
Aurora Public Schools, Rangeview High School (PIO: Corey Christiansen 303-326-2755)
City of Aurora Courts and Detention Center (PIO: Michael Bryant 303-739-7181)
Medical Center of Aurora (PIO: Laura Stephens 303-873-5699)
Aurora Fire Rescue (PIO: Tony Krenz 720-477-0315)
Falck Ambulance
Arapahoe County Coroner
Health One Air Life

WHAT: The “Every 15 Minutes” Program is a two-day event that brings together high school juniors and seniors and challenges them to think about the consequences of drinking and driving. The program also educates students on personal safety, responsible and mature decision making and the impact their decisions can have on family, friends, the community and their futures. Students work with local organizations and family members to craft a scenario to act out in front of peers and role play the consequences of their decisions and actions.

WHEN: Thursday, April 26
(Please arrive at 11:30 a.m. to set-up before the crash scene begins at 12 p.m.)

WHY: Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the U.S., more than homicide and suicide combined. There are at least 60 traffic fatalities in Colorado every year that can be attributed to distracted driving. Alcohol-related collisions are the leading cause of death among teenage youth.

The Aurora Police Department and Aurora Public Schools are partnering with Rangeview High School to host the “Every 15 Minutes” program in Aurora Colorado. The event brings together community leaders including the City of Aurora, Medical Center of Aurora, Aurora Fire Rescue, City of Aurora Courts and Detention Center, Arapahoe County Coroner, Health One Air Life and Falck Ambulance to take a proactive step in educating local high school students about making mature decisions when alcohol and drugs are involved.

Additional Information and Media Opportunity:

Media is welcome to attend the crash scene that will be simulated on April 26 at 12 p.m. There will be a designated area for media to set up, as there will be many moving components during the scenario (arrival of patrol cars, fire trucks, ambulances and a helicopter).

Interviews will be provided to media before or after the crash scene on April 26. If interested in filming other parts of the event, please contact the designated PIO to make arrangements.

Media are invited to attend the second day of the event on Friday, April 27 at 8 a.m. at Rangeview High School. Students, parents and teachers will gather to watch the video that was created on April 26, and there will be speakers including members of the Aurora Police Department and Faculty and Staff of Rangeview High School   

Officer Kenneth Forrest
Public Information Officer
Media Relations Unit
(720) 432-5095
Posted by kforrest@auroragov.org  On Apr 25, 2018 at 11:47 AM
  

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Post by Chris G. 

The history of the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction is fairly interesting. The award itself is named after the international association of writers, PEN (which is an acronym for "Poets, Playwrights, Essayists, Editors, and Novelists), and the prolific American author William Faulkner.
Faulkner was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1949 "for his powerful and artistically unique contribution to the modern American novel." In 1960, he used his prize money to establish the William Faulkner Foundation, a charitable organization intended to support young writers. Among other things, the Faulkner Foundation gave out an annual literary prize called the William Faulkner Foundation Award, the winners of which include names like John Knowles, Thomas Pynchon, Cormac McCarthy, and Robert Coover. After 10 years, the Faulkner Foundation was dissolved in 1970. The PEN/Faulkner Award was named to honor Faulkner's philanthropy, as well as to continue in the Faulkner Foundation Award's tradition of recognizing works of literary excellence.
The PEN/Faulkner Award was founded in 1980 by Mary Lee Settle, who herself had won the National Book Award in 1978 for her novel "Blood Tie". This resulted from some controversy surrounding the 1979 National Book Award winner, "Going After Cacciato" by Tim O'Brien. Many in the publishing industry believed that year's award should have gone to John Irving for "The World According to Garp", which led to a rift among the panel of judges and ultimately changes to the rules of how the National Book Awards were judged. In protest of these rule changes, PEN voted to boycott the awards, citing them as "too commercial." The following year, the PEN/Faulkner Award was established. Settle's vision was that the "awards would be judged by writers, not by industry insiders, and no favoritism would be granted to bestselling authors."
Now in its 38th year, the PEN/Faulkner Award is among the most prestigious literary honors an author can receive, and continues to fulfill Settle's mission "to create a community of writers, honor excellence in American fiction, and encourage a love of reading."
The 2018 PEN/Faulkner Award winner was announced on Saturday, May 5th. All of this year's nominees, the winner as well as many winners of years past are available to be borrowed from the Aurora Public Library. You can find those titles and the formats in which they are available below.  

  This Year's Nominees


 "In the Distance" by Hernan Diaz

   
 "The Dark Dark" by Samantha Hunt Also available as an eBook.

   
 "The Tower of the Antilles" by Achy Obejas

   
 "Improvement" by Joan Silber


 "Sing, Unburied, Sing" by Jesmyn Ward Also available as an audiobook, eBook, and eAudiobook.


Past Winners

2017

 "Behold the Dreamers" by Imbolo Mbue Also available as an eBook.
2016

 "Delicious Foods" by James Hannaham
   2014

 "We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves" by Karen Joy Fowler
2012

 "The Buddha in the Attic" by Julie Otsuka
2010

 "War Dances" by Sherman Alexie Available as an eAudiobook through RBDigital. 
2009

 "Netherland" by Joseph O'Neill Also available in Large Print and as an audiobook.
2007

  "Everyman" by Philip Roth Also available as an audiobook and eAudiobook.
   2006

  "The March" by E.L. Doctorow
   2005

 "War Trash" by Ha Jin
2004

 "The Early Stories, 1953-1975" by John Updike
   2002

 "Bel Canto" by Ann Patchett Also available as an eBook.
2001

  "The Human Stain" by Philip Roth Also available in Large Print.
   2000

  "Waiting" by Ha Jin Also available in Large Print and as an eBook.
   1999

 "The Hours" by Michael Cunningham
   1997

  "Women in their Beds" by Gina Berriault
1996

 "Independence Day" by Richard Ford Available as an eAudiobook through RBDigital.
1995

 "Snow Falling on Cedars" by David Guterson Available as an audiobook, eBook, and eAudiobook.
   1993

 "Postcards" by E. Annie Proulx

And the 2018 winner is...

 "Improvement" by Joan Silber 

 



Sources: The Nobel Prize in Literature 1949 Notes on People; New York Writer Getting PEN/Faulkner Award Novelist Mary Lee Settle; Founded PEN/Faulkner Award PEN/Faulkner PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction PEN International William Faulkner Foundation
Posted by zsmith@auroragov.org  On May 17, 2018 at 2:10 PM
  
On April 27th, 2018 at 9:42 pm Aurora Police Department officers responded to South Chambers Road and South Evantson Way on the report of an accident involving a vehicle and a motorcycle. The driver of the motorcycle was transported to a local hospital and was declared deceased.
The involvement of alcohol and speed are under investigation. The driver of the vehicle is cooperating with the investigation.

The identity of the motorcyclist is not being released at this time pending the notification of next of kin. If you have any information regarding this accident please contact:

Sgt. Mike Douglass
Aurora Police Traffic Section
303-739-6293
Posted by mdouglas@auroragov.org  On Apr 28, 2018 at 12:23 AM
  
On April 25th, 2018 at 8:26 pm, officers responded to the location of E. Iliff Ave at S. Naples Way on the report of an accident involving a vehicle and a motorcycle. Aurora Fire Rescue Responded and the motorcycle driver was pronounced deceased on scene.

At this time, there are no initial indications that alcohol was involved, but speed may be a factor. The driver of the vehicle was transported to a local hospital with no injuries.

The identity of the motorcyclist is not being released at this time pending notification of next of kin.

If you have any information regarding this accident please contact:

Sgt. Mike Douglass
Aurora Police Traffic Section
303-739-6293
Posted by mdouglas@auroragov.org  On Apr 25, 2018 at 10:43 PM
  
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