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Single Family Home Projects
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 "Colorado's Only IAS Accredited Building Division"

To learn more about building accreditation click here or on the IAS icon below.Single Family

Building Division - Permit Center
15151 E. Alameda Parkway, 2nd Floor
Aurora CO 80012
303-739-7420

Hours of Operation:
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday
7:30 am to 4:30 pm
Wednesday - 8:30 am to 4:30 pm


From replacing a water heater to building a new home, first ask yourself  “Do I need a building permit?”  Even small home improvement projects may require a building permit.  Faulty installations can cause fires, flood damage and other hazards, and also force you to make costly repairs when you sell your home.  Permits, and the inspections that come with them, protect your family’s safety and the value of your property by ensuring the work meets adopted building codes.        

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To begin, select one of the categories below that best describes the residential work you would like to do. If you are a commercial builder, please select “New Homes."     

Residential Home Builder

Single Familiy Page

To initiate any new land development within the city of Aurora, even the construction of a single home, it's best to start with the Office of Development Assistance (ODA). ODA staff provides guidance and facilitation of construction projects through a coordinated multi-departmental approach, and is highly responsive to customers as they work through the city’s development process.

The Building Division offers two plan review submittal checklists to assist the developer in submitting construction plans for review and approval. 

  • Custom Single Family Permit: This type of permit is for a one-time build structure that will not be repeated within a site. 
  • Master Plan Single Family Permit: This type of plan review is used when the same structure will be built repetitiously on the same site. By having an approved "Master Plan" on file within the Building Division, the general contractor can pull an address specific permit when needed.  

Along with detailed information for construction plan submittal requirements, these checklists reflect the plan review turnaround times for the Building Division. Check Plan Review Timelines  for other interdepartmental reviews schedules.  

Tips for doing it right:

  • Buildings have various zoning requirements. Due to the complexity of zoning laws, the only accurate way to obtain the zoning requirements is to visit the building and zoning code web page or call 303-739-7250. 
  • Submit a Permit Application, Plot Plan and construction plans to the Building Division for review and approval prior to the start of any new work. For construction plan submittal requirements, use either the Custom Single Family Home Checklist or Master Single Family Residential Plan Review Checklist.
  • Construction plans can be submitted in person at the Permit Center or through the Online Permit Submittal Process. Once on the web page, place your mouse on “Building and Development” to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits.” 
  • Once the construction plans are approved, the permit can be issued to a licensed contractor. To verify that the contractor's license is current, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool.
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct each new home.  
  • Once the permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit and then begin construction.   
  • Clarification on calculating valuations for single family custom homes:  Since custom homes are different from master plans in terms of only being built once our Division will take the finished square footage of the main and upper floors multiplied by $105. If the applicant will finish the basement, our staff will calculate that area just as you would a basement finish at $5.06 X square footage (+ baths, fireplaces, and etc).
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to make sure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Custom Home (Do-It-Yourself)

Single Family Home

For those interested in personalizing their home beyond the basics, custom building is the answer. Have special requirements or special needs? Custom homes afford consumers the opportunity to control layout, lot size and accessibility. To help you get started with your project, our staff can help you understand and obtain valuable information on codes and ordinances, construction practices and property data. 

The city of Aurora has developed a home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The handbook is titled DIY and DIR for Do-It-Yourself and Do-It-Right. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right: 

  • To begin, you will want to contact the Office of Development Assistance (ODA) to schedule a pre-application meeting. The information provided in this meeting will help you understand the city of Aurora submittal requirements to obtain development approval and building permits. A project manager in ODA can assist you in setting up this important meeting. Inquiries regarding the development process should be directed to the ODA at 303-739-7345 or oda@auroragov.org
  • Buildings have various zoning requirements and due to the complexity of zoning laws, the only accurate way to obtain the zoning requirements is to visit the building and zoning code web page or call 303-739-7250. 
  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. See the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above for further guidance.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application to the Building Division, and complete a Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, you may verify that their contractor's license is current by using the Online Contractor Look-up Tool.
  • Licensed contractors can also submit for a building permit using the Online Permit Submittal Process. On the web page, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu; then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new home.
  • Clarification on calculating valuations for single family custom homes:  Since custom homes are different from master plans in terms of only being built once our Division will take the finished square footage of the main and upper floors multiplied by $105. If the applicant will finish  the basement, our staff will calculate that area just as you would a basement finish at $5.06 X square footage (+ baths, fireplaces, and etc).
  • Submit construction plans and a Plot Plan to the Building Division for review and approval. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit and then construction may begin.
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to make sure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms, applications and information you will need: 

Additions to Existing Home

Single Family

Constructing an addition, a sun room or seasonal-use room or enclosing your existing patio cover are less expensive ways to expand your home's living space. To make certain that the new living space is safe and structurally sound, a city building permit must be obtained.

Building a home addition can be a good alternative to buying a new home or building a house from scratch. Besides saving money, it's a way to invest in your home and customize your home to serve your family's specific needs and desires. To help you get started with a project, the Building Division staff can help you understand and obtain valuable information on codes and ordinances, construction practices and property data. The information below will help you identify what building permitting requirements are needed. 

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right: 

  • Buildings have various zoning requirements and due to the complexity of zoning laws, the only accurate way to obtain the zoning requirements is to visit the zoning and building code web page or call 303-739-7250. 
  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” above for further assistance.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application to the Building Division, and complete a Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, verify their contractor's license is current by using the Online Contractor Look-up Tool.
  • Licensed contractors can also submit for a building permit using the Online Permit Submittal Process. On the web page, place your mouse on “Building and Development” to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new home.
  • Submit construction plans and a Plot Plan to the Building Division for review and approval. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit, and then construction may begin.
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to make sure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Asphalt Work within the Public Right-of-Way

Outside the Home

Prior to obtaining a public improvement permit through the Building Division, the licensed “Right-of-Way” (ROW) contractor must first contact the Public Works Engineer of the Day at 303-739-7300. The Engineer of the Day will determine if there are approved civil plans on file or assess the scope of work to determine what will be needed prior to the issuance of a public improvement permit. Review the Public Improvement Permit Instructions for all public improvement permit instructions.

  • A permit is required prior to starting any work within the city of Aurora right-of-way. Work includes constructing, enlarging, altering, repairing, moving, improving, removing, excavating, converting, or demolishing any public improvements or common facilities. This permit lets the city know what work is being done and provides a way for the city to monitor and inspect the work.
  • A public improvement permit will only be issued to a contractor licensed within the city of Aurora to conduct work within a public right-of-way. 

Tips for doing it right:

  • After satisfying the requirements of the Public Works Engineer of the Day, the contractor then may submit a completed Due Diligence Checklist & Application Improvement Permit and Traffic Control Plans to the Building Division. The contractor may also email these documents to permitcounter@auroragov.org.
  • Homeowners may use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to obtain the services of a licensed ROW contractor.
  • Contractors also may obtain the construction requirements for work done within public right-of-way from the Roadway Specification Manual.
  • Permit fees will be based on the Public Improvements Permit Fee Schedule.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the public improvement permit before starting work within the public right-of-way.
  • Contact our public improvement inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Carports & Patio Covers

Outside the Home

Whether creating shelter for a car, truck or motorcycle with a car port or a new year-round outdoor living space by adding a patio cover, the Building Division can assist you in making certain that a new home project such as this is safe and structurally sound.  

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:   

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" section above for help.
  • Buildings have various zoning requirements and due to the complexity of zoning laws, the only accurate way to obtain the zoning requirements is to contact or visit the Building & Zoning Code web page or call 303-739-7250.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • Review and submit a completed Building Guide for your construction plans to show how your project will be built. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • A Plot Plan will also need to be submitted with construction plans to ensure compliance with setbacks to property lines and utility easements.  
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may submit for a building permit by using the Online Permit Submittal Process. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development” to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new home.
  • Submit construction plans and a Plot Plan to the Building Division for review and approval. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting construction on your new home.   
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

 Forms and applications you will need:

Decks & Patios

Outside the Home

Installing or replacing a deck or patio is pretty common project for a DIY homeowner or contractor. However, structural integrity is the most important factor in any deck or patio building project; a collapse of an improperly designed structure can be dangerous or even fatal. Going through the city permitting process will ensure the new deck or patio is safe and structurally sound.  

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:   

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" above for help.
  • Buildings have various zoning requirements and due to the complexity of zoning laws, the only accurate way to obtain the zoning requirements is to visit the Building & Zoning web page or call 303-739-7250.
  • If you decide to do-it-yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • Review and submit a completed Building Guide for your construction plans to show how your project will be built. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • A Plot Plan also will need to be submitted with your construction plans to ensure compliance with setbacks to property lines and utility easements.  
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may submit for a building permit using the Online Permit Submittal Process. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development” to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee by using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new home.
  • Submit construction plans and a Plot Plan to the Building Division for review and approval. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting the construction of your new home.   
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

 Forms and applications you will need:

Driveways & Parking Surfaces

Outside the Home

The city of Aurora requires permit application and review, and field inspection of residential driveways and parking surfaces to ensure Public Works standards for proper drainage, construction and safety are followed, reduce right-of-way erosion and maintenance, and maintain traffic safety.

You will need to hire a licensed right-of-way contractor to install any asphalt or concrete work that is within the city’s right-of-way.

  • City right-of-way is typically located between the edge of sidewalk closest to your home and the face of curb at the adjacent street.  The concrete or asphalt on your side of the sidewalk can be replaced by the primary homeowner. 

No building permit is required for the removal and replacement of existing driveways, pads or parking spaces where the material type, location, size and slope is not being changed.  

Tips for doing it right:

  • If you are the primary owner and resident of the home, you may obtain a homeowners building permit for your proposed work. If you own the home but do not reside in the home, or you are leasing/renting the home, you will need to hire a licensed contractor to do the work.
  • Do you live in an area that has an active homeowner's association?  If so, you may be required to follow the covenants established by your community HOA.  
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Due Diligence Checklist & Application Improvement Permit and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • Submit a Plot Plan with your application showing complete yard dimensions inside of your property boundary of front or rear yards affected by the proposed driveway, including existing and proposed driveway location and dimensions. Include the orientation of your home within the lot.  
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current. There are four types of right-of-way contractors shown; ROW asphalt and concrete contractors are the most typical for this type of work.
  • Your contractor also may obtain the construction requirements for work done within public right-of-way from the Roadway Specification Manual.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development” to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • To determine the permit fee, use the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and then add the $61.50 for the total.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your driveway or private parking area.  
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

 Forms, applications and information you will need:

Enclosing Existing Patio Covers

Outside the Home

When you are thinking about being able to enjoy your home more, probably one of the first things that comes to mind is enclosing your existing patio cover. Creating more space to enjoy your favorite activities means making your outdoor space more user friendly. Review the building guide first to understand what information the city will need to review your project. 

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:   

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" above for help.
  • Buildings have various zoning requirements and due to the complexity of zoning laws, the only accurate way to obtain the zoning requirements is to visit the Building & Zoning Code web page or call 303-739-7250.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • Review and submit a completed Building Guide for your construction plans to show how your project will be built. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • A Plot Plan also will need to be submitted with your construction plans to ensure compliance with setbacks to property lines and utility easements.  
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development” to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new home.
  • Submit construction plans and a Plot Plan to the Building Division for review and approval. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting the construction of your new home.   
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project.  Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

 Forms and applications you will need:

Fencing

Single Family

A Special Note About Fences: The Aurora City Council recently approved an ordinance change that eliminates the requirement of a fence permit for the installation of fences that are six feet tall or less. This applies to both new and replacement fences. All fences greater than six feet in height will require a building permit. Contact the Building Division for questions regarding the change to the fence ordinance. Despite not needing a permit to construct fences six feet or less in height, all fences must still comply with city code requirements regarding their construction, location and materials.  

Permit Requirements for Fences Greater than Six Feet High: 

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" section above for help.  
  • Either you or your contractor will need to submit a permit application, plan, plot plan and a receipt of materials costs to the Building Division for review and approval. The plot plan will be reviewed for compliance with setbacks to property lines and utility easements. 
  • If you are a homeowner, the best scenario is to get a materials cost estimate, then come to the city to obtain your permit. When going to buy your materials, show the retailer your building permit and they will waive the use tax fees for the materials.
  • Your home may be considered an interior lot, standard corner lot or a reverse corner lot.  Each one of these will have separate requirements. Review city code to ensure you meet the minimum requirements for the lot. If you are not sure what type of lot your house is on, the fence diagram will help. For questions, call the Building Division at 303-739-7420.
  • Homeowners living in an area with an active homeowner's association are required to follow the covenants established by your community. Otherwise, you are required to follow the fence requirements as established by city code. Review the "Fence Contractors - Due Diligence Instructions & Checklist" list for additional guidance.  
  • At times, a fence waiver may apply. Contact the Building Division at 303-739-7420 to determine if this fits your situation.
  • Once plans are approved, review the work to make sure it matches the approved plans and the adopted codes. 
  • Contact inspectors for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project so that it meets all building codes.

Forms, applications and information: 

Submit your plans to the Building Division by:

  • Coming to the Aurora Municipal Center's Permit Center, 15151 E. Alameda Parkway, Second Floor, Aurora, CO 80012
  • Sending plans by mail
  • Emailing plans to buildingplans@auroragov.org.

Fence Replacement Program:

Aurora created a fence replacement program that offers numerous masonry fence styles that are much more durable than wood fences. Masonry fences require little maintenance, reduce traffic noise and are maintained by the city. The Neighborhood Fence Replacement Program is based on neighborhood initiation and support. If you think that your neighborhood would be interested in this program, contact a Neighborhood Liaison at 303-739-7280 for more information.  

Information and contact links:

Garages - Attached & Detached

Single Family

To guarantee a safe and structurally sound garage, a city building permit is required. Start by submitting a plan to the Building Division for review and approval before work begins. Review the building guide first to understand what information the city will need to review your project. 

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:   

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" above for help.
  • Buildings have various zoning requirements and due to the complexity of zoning laws, the only accurate way to obtain the zoning requirements is to visit the Building & Zoning Codes web page or call 303-739-7250.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • Review and submit the applicable building guide (links are below) for either an attached or detached garage or your own construction plans to show how your project will be built. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • A Plot Plan also will need to be submitted with your construction plans to ensure compliance with setbacks to property lines and utility easements.  
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new garage.
  • Submit construction plans and a Plot Plan to the Building Division for review and approval. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting the construction of your new attached or detached garage.   
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

 Forms and applications you will need:

Pergolas

Single Family

Here’s a summer project designed to keep you cooler on even the hottest of days. The classical columns support an overhead wooden lattice that works like a big shade tree, letting only a portion of the sun’s radiance shine through. By going through the city permitting process you can ensure that your new pergola is safe and structurally sound. 

The city of Aurora has developed a "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:   

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" above for help.
  • Buildings have various zoning requirements and due to the complexity of zoning laws, the only accurate way to obtain the zoning requirements is to visit the Building & Zoning Codes web page or call 303-739-7250.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • Submit construction plans to show how your project will be built. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • A Plot Plan also will need to be submitted with your construction plans to ensure compliance with setbacks to property lines and utility easements.  
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors may also use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new garage.
  • Submit construction plans and a Plot Plan to the Building Division for review and approval. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting the construction of your new attached or detached garage.   
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

 Forms and applications you will need:

Re-roofing

 Outside the Home
 
Every home has a roof, and every roof will eventually need replacement regardless of how well it was installed. Roof replacement requires a building permit to ensure that the materials and installation meet the current building codes. As a homeowner in Aurora, you can do the work yourself or hire a licensed contractor. If you do it yourself, you will be responsible for making sure all work meets code and passes all inspections. 
 
The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right: 

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" above for help. 
  • If you decide to do it yourself, you will need to submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • Review the Building Guide and the Notice to Roofing Contractors and All Interested Parties prior to obtaining a building permit. 
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may submit for a building permit using the Online Permit Submittal Process. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development” to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to re-roof your home.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting work on re-roofing your home.
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work it complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms and applications you will need:

Sheds and Other Accessory Structures

Single Family

A building permit is required to build a shed or any other accessory structure that is greater than 120 square feet in floor area. Smaller structures do not need a building permit, but the location of your structure must still comply with the city's zoning set back requirements to property lines and placement within the yard.  

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right: 

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" above for help. 
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • Always check with your homeowner's association if you have one for additional requirements that may exist.
  • Submit construction plans and a Plot Plan to the Building Division for review and approval. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • Call the Permit Staff at 303-739-7420 to obtain the proper setback requirements for the placement of your shed. 
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development” to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to complete your new shed.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting construction of your new shed.   
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms and applications you will need:

Siding

Single Family

New or replacement siding on your home will require a building permit. The Building Division will want to oversee the work because the materials and workmanship must be able to stand up to the weather in our area. Also, the surface beneath the siding must be properly prepared, so that moisture won't penetrate the walls, causing a mold and rot issue. An inspector will make sure the home is properly sealed.

Covering or repairing siding also will require a building permit, even if you are simply installing new siding on top of old material. No building permit is necessary for repair work involving less than 10 square feet of siding.

Cosmetic changes to your siding, such as painting or staining, will not require a building permit. Your neighborhood, however, may have property covenants that govern the appearance of homes. Those covenants may limit the colors or materials you can use. You may need to get approval from a local zoning board, homeowners association or historic district commission to make cosmetic changes.

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.


Tips for doing it right: 

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" above for help. 
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current. Your contractor will requires a city of Aurora D-11 license.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to complete your new shed.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting construction of your new siding.
  • Contact city inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Skylights

Single Family

Skylights are effective tool you can use for maximizing the sun’s natural energy. By installing more skylights into your home, you can reap the rewards of using less artificial lighting. As a homeowner in Aurora, you may do the work yourself or hire a licensed contractor. The information below is to help you identify what building permitting requirements are needed.  

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right: 

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" above for help.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development” to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to complete your new skylight.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting construction of your new skylight.
  • Contact city inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Solar Photovoltaic or Solar Thermal Installations (Residential or Commercial)

Single Family

Increasingly, homeowners, businesses and governments are turning to solar energy as a way to power their electricity needs because solar power systems generate clean energy and are a solution to global warming. Like you, Aurora recognizes the many benefits that solar energy systems can provide. Building permitting information is listed below, and state and federal incentives are detailed on the “Solar Installations” web link.    

To help you take advantage of many solar opportunities and make certain your solar equipment is installed safely and is structurally sound, a city building permit must be obtained prior to any new construction.

Tips for doing it right: 

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" above for help. 
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • Review the Residential Solar Photovoltaic Permit Checklist to obtain the minimum elements that need to be shown within your construction plans for submittal to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors may also use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to complete your new shed.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting construction of your new solar equipment.
  • Contact city inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.  

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Stucco

Single Family

Applying stucco is a great way to enhance the beauty of any home, and the application of this great material is well within the skills of a licensed contractor and most homeowners.

The addition of new or replacement stucco siding on your home will require a building permit. The Building Division will want to oversee the work because the materials and workmanship must be able to stand up to the weather in our area. Also, the surface beneath the stucco siding must be properly prepared so that moisture won't penetrate the walls, causing a mold and rot issue. An inspector will make sure the home is properly sealed.

Covering or repairing stucco siding also will require a building permit, even if you are simply installing new stucco siding on top of old material. No building permit is necessary for repair work involving less than 10 square feet of stucco siding.

Cosmetic changes to your stucco siding, such as painting or staining, will not require a building permit. Your neighborhood, however, may have property covenants that govern the appearance of homes. Those covenants may limit the colors or materials you can use. You may need to get approval from a homeowners' association to make cosmetic changes.

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" above for help.
  • If you decide to do it-yourself, you will need to submit a completed “Permit Application” to the Building Division.  You will also need to complete a “Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit”.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current. Your contractor will require a city of Aurora D-11 license.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to complete your new stucco siding work.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting construction of your new stucco siding.
  • Contact city inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure it complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Swimming Pools - Hot Tubs - Spas

Single Family

Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" section above for help. 

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Review the building guide for issues related to this project type.
  • Submit a plan and plot plan to the Building Division for review and approval. The plot plan also will be reviewed for compliance with setbacks to property lines and utility easements.
  • Once plans are approved, review the work to make sure it matches the approved plans and adopted codes.
  • Contact inspectors for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project so that it meets all building codes.

Forms and applications you will need:  

Windows & Doors

Single Family

Whether you need a permit or not depends on the extent of the work involved. Replacement of windows can be as simple as replacing the existing windows with “inserts” that are installed directly in the existing frame of the old window. With this type of a replacement, no structural alterations or removal of the sash is involved. A permit is not required for this type of window replacement. However, be aware that in the replacement of windows, you must still comply with regulations related to safety glazing and emergency egress. These topics will be explained later in this section.  

A permit will be required if the replacement of your windows involves the removal of the existing wood or metal sashes, or if alterations are made to the existing opening. The information below will identify the building permitting requirements.  

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. See the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above to assist you in making this decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to install your new window(s).
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your new window(s) or door(s).
  • Contact city inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. 
  • An inspection of your project must be made before any framing is concealed.
  • The installation of the window must be reviewed by the inspector to determine if the window or door has been installed, flashed and caulked correctly.
  • Inspection of new wall coverings (sheet rock, siding, stucco wire) must be conducted before nailing has been concealed or stucco applied.
  • Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Air Conditioning

Single Family

If you are comfortable performing electrical and mechanical home projects and have a basic set of tools, installing your own air conditioner can be a straight-forward job. The work consists of two primary parts: what you can do on your own, which is about 90 percent of the project, and what your local heating and air conditioning contractor should do for you to complete the job. Due to laws pertaining to the handling of refrigerant as well as special tools required, the completion of the project is to be done by an air conditioning professional.

To make certain that a new or replacement central air conditioning system is installed safely and correctly; a city building permit must be obtained by either the homeowner or a licensed HVAC contractor.

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:  

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Review the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" section above for help.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current. Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on "Building & Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Homeowners living in an area with an active homeowner's association (HOA) may be required to follow the covenants established the HOA.
  • Homeowners who do the work themselves must submit a completed Permit Application to the Building Division. The permit application must include the size of the air conditioning unit to establish the Valuation Costs for Counter Permits.  Once the valuation is determined you will be able to determine the overall Permit Fees for your project.
  • As the homeowner, you also will need to complete a Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit from.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit. You then may start installation of your central air conditioner.
  • Contact inspectors for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project.
  • Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

Forms and applications you will need: 

Basement Finish

Single Family

Converting a dark and dingy basement into a bright inviting family room or home theater area is a great way to increase the value of your home and expand your living space. However, there are some building code issues that must be considered when taking on a project like finishing a basement. These include providing adequate egress from a living area and making sure there is heat and lighting.  

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:    

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor.  For information to assist you in making this decision see "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" above.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowners form to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current. Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on "Building & Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • A Building Guide link is provided below to that outlines issues related to this project.
  • Submit a plan to the Building Division for review and approval that shows the existing basement and rooms to be finished. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards. 
  • The Permit Fee valuation assessed for your basement improvement is $5.06 per square foot. This fee assessment is used to determine the cost for the plan review, permit and use tax.  
  • Once plans are approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting construction. 
  • During construction, city building inspectors will need to check on the work to make sure it matches the approved plans, and the adopted building codes. 

Forms and applications you will need: 

Boilers

Single Familiy Page

Whether you are installing a new residential boiler or hiring a licensed contractor to do it for you, the proper installation is the key to ensuring your new boiler operates safely, reliably and at maximum efficiency. The Building Division will require a permit and inspection to help ensure your installation is compliant with the building codes.  

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" information about to assist in making this decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application to the Building Division. The application must include heat input in BTUs, and indicate whether you are adding new electrical outlet/circuit or re-connecting into an existing outlet/circuit.
  • As a homeowner, you also will need to complete a Statement of Understanding for Homeowners form.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to install the boiler.
  • Any single-family residence that has altered any gas appliance will need to obtain the inspection of the permitted scope of work as well as carbon monoxide inspection per International Residential Code (IRC) requirements.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your new boiler.
  • Contact city building inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.
  • Licensed contractors may obtain a permit using the Online Permit Submittal Process.

Forms, applications and information you will need: 

Demolition

Single Familiy Page

Demolition of an entire structure or just an interior portion of a residential or commercial structure that is 120 square feet or greater requires a building permit. Demolition of a residential structure less than 120 square feet does not require a permit with the city.  

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" section above to assist in making this decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractor’s license is current.
  • Submit a plan and Plot Plan (for a full building demolition) to the Building Division for review and approval.
  • Once the permit is issued, check the work to make sure it matches the approved permit documents and the adopted codes. 

 Forms and applications you will need:

Electrical

main page

Electrical systems can seem like a confusing mess of connections, cables and boxes hidden inside the walls. But with a little common sense and a few precautions, do it yourselfers can handle most projects. Electrical work can be intimidating because it can be dangerous, and some accidents can cause serious injury. If you're not confident in your ability to do electrical work, continue to learn more about it or consider hiring someone to do the work.

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the "Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself" section above for information to assist in making this decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current. Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on "Building & Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • All electrical contractors must be licensed by the State of Colorado as an Electrical Contractor.  Use this link to verify that your contractor is properly licensed with the state.
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to install the electrical work.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your new electrical project.
  • Contact city building inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they will look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.
  • Licensed contractors may obtain a permit using the Online Permit Submittal Process.

 Forms and applications you will need:

Evaporative Cooler

Single Family

If you are comfortable performing electrical and mechanical home projects and have a basic set of tools, installing your own evaporative cooler can be a straight-forward job. To make certain that a new or replacement evaporative cooler is installed safely and correctly; a city building permit must be obtained by either the homeowner or a licensed HVAC contractor.

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above to assist in making this decision.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current. Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on "Building & Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Homeowners living in an area with an active homeowners' association (HOA) may be required to follow the covenants established by the HOA.
  • Homeowners who do the work themselves must submit a completed Permit Application to the Building Division. The permit application must include the size of the air conditioning unit to establish the Valuation Costs for Counter Permits. Once the valuation is determined, you will be able to determine the overall Permit Fees for your project.
  • As the homeowner, you will also need to complete a Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit from.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your central air conditioner.
  • Contact city building inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they will look for during inspections and how to complete the project. 
  • Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Furnace

Single Family

Your project likely falls into one of two categories: replacing an existing heating system, or installing a new one for the first time in a new or renovated home. The information below will assist you identify what permitting requirements and services are available to you.  

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

 Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above to assist in making this decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee by first using the Valuation Costs for Counter Permits to determine what the BTU and efficiency size is for your new furnace, then place this valuation in the Online Fee Calculator
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your new furnace.
  • Contact city building inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Gas Fireplace

Single Familiy Page

Whether or not you can install your new fireplace yourself depends on which type of fireplace you select, and what your skills and training are. If you select a gas fireplace, for example, you will at the very least need to have a licensed plumber or mechanical contractor check your gas line and connect it to your fireplace. Some fireplaces can require an electrical inspection as well. The information below will help identify the building permitting requirements.   

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above to assist in making this decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to install the fireplace.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your new gas fireplace.  
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. 
  • Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Garage Conversion

Single Family

A garage conversion can be one of the quickest and most affordable ways to add living space to a home. Our plan review and inspections typically focus on structural, heating and cooling, electrical, and sometimes plumbing. The information below will identify the building permitting requirements. 

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

 Tips for doing it right:

  • Prior to submitting construction plans you will first have to obtain zoning approval through Planning & Development Services (303-739-7250). The Aurora Building and Zoning Code, Section 146-1302(C)4, reflects specific requirements that must be considered before undertaking any garage conversion.
  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above to assist in making this decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new living space.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your new living space.
  • Contact city building inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Interior Remodel

Single Familiy Page

There are a variety of remodeling projects that can be done in your home, some of which require a permit. As a general guideline, if you’re remodeling project entails changing anything within the wall space (i.e. wiring, plumbing, moving or adding a wall, etc.), a building permit is needed. To ensure that the remodeling work is code compliant, contact the Building Division to speak with a staff member about your project. 

Replacement of cabinets, counter tops, sinks, toilets and appliances usually do not require a permit. Call the Building Division to verify that no permit is required. However, moving a sink, toilet or bathtub, changing an oven/stove from gas to electric, or installing a new range or exhaust hood will require building permits. Most remodeling projects can be permitted without plan submittal, and performed by the owner of the home without a contractor. 

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above to assist in making a decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building process. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new living space.
  • Submit construction plans to the Building Division for review and approval that shows the existing room configuration and the rooms to be finished. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your new living space.  
  • Contact city building inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

 Forms and applications you will need:

Kitchen Remodel

Single Family

It's often difficult to know when you need a permit for your remodeling project. A building permit is required if your kitchen remodel includes:

  • Moving a sink or adding new plumbing fixtures.
  • Demolishing a load-bearing wall.
  • Electrical work beyond replacing an electrical outlet.
  • Changing an oven/stove from gas to electric or installing a new range or exhaust hood

Replacement of cabinets, counter tops, sinks, toilets and appliances usually do not require a permit. Most remodeling projects can be permitted without plan submittal, and performed by the owner of the home without a contractor. To ensure that the remodeling work is code compliant or to determine if your project requires a permit, contact the Building Division to speak with a staff member about your project. 

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above to assist in making this decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new living space.
  • Submit construction plans to the Building Division for review and approval. Plans should show the existing room configuration and the rooms to be finished. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your kitchen area.
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms and applications you will need:

Mechanical

Single Family

Mechanical permits are required for work on heating, cooling and ventilation systems. Installing a natural gas line, vent, fuel oil tank or chimney liner for appliances or other equipment is also considered mechanical work.  

A plan review is not required for most single-family residential electrical, mechanical and plumbing work. These types of improvements are classified as counter permits and are typically done at the Permit Center. City field inspectors ensure a correct installation per the building codes. 

To ensure that the mechanical work is code compliant or determine if your project requires a permit, contact the Building Division to speak with a staff member about your project. 

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above to assist in making this decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to install your new mechanical work.  
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your mechanical work.
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project.  Once your installation is complete you will need to schedule a final inspection so they can check on the work to make sure it complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms and applications you will need:

Plumbing

Single Family

A plan review is not required for most single-family residential electrical, mechanical and plumbing work. These types of improvements are classified as counter permits and are typically done at the Permit Center. City field inspectors ensure a correct installation per the building codes. 

To ensure that the plumbing work is code compliant or determine if your project requires a permit, contact the Building Division to speak with a staff member about your project. 

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right: 

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above to assist in making this decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to install your new plumbing work.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your plumbing work.
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms and applications you will need:

Water Heaters

Single Familiy Page

A plan review is not required for most single-family residential electrical, mechanical and plumbing work. Changing, moving or repairing a water heater or tankless water heater requires a plumbing permit. These types of improvements are classified as counter permits and are typically done at the Permit Center. City field inspectors ensure a correct installation per the building codes.

To ensure that the plumbing work is code compliant or determine if your project requires a permit, contact the Building Division to speak with a staff member about your project.

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above to assist in making this decision.
  • If you decide to do it yourself, submit a completed Permit Application and Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to the Building Division.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to install your new water heater.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting installation of your water heater or tankless water heater.
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms and Applications you will need:

Wood Fireplaces & Wood Stoves

2013-Fire Place

When considering the purchase of a new or replacement wood burning stove or fireplace to augment the heat in your home, there are things you as the homeowner must consider. As a homeowner in Aurora, you may install or replace a wood fireplace or wood stove in your home or hire a licensed contractor to do it for you. If you choose to do it yourself, you will be responsible for making sure all work meets the building code and passes all inspections.

Prior to visiting the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment (CDPHE) website, you should know that the city of Aurora only allows the installation of EPA Phase II or Colorado Phase III certified devices. 

According to the CDPHE, certain burning devices are exempt from the state regulation that bans residential burning in the six-county Denver metro area on air quality Action Days. These exempt burning devices have been approved and certified by the state of Colorado and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and are designed to emit low levels of pollution. Exempt devices include those that carry either the EPA Phase II or Colorado Phase III certification. These certified devices include certain brands of wood stoves and inserts, pellet stoves and inserts, and masonry heaters. The following links will provide information on certified devices that are exempt from the residential burning regulation. 

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Tips for doing it right:

  • Determine if you will be doing this project yourself or hiring a licensed contractor. Visit the “Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself” section above to assist in making this decision.
  • If you choose to hire a contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool to verify that their contractors' license is current. Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on "Building & Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Homeowners living in an area with an active homeowners' association (HOA) may be required to follow the covenants established the HOA.
  • Homeowners who do the work themselves must submit a completed Permit Application to the Building Division. The permit application must include the size of the air conditioning unit to establish the Valuation Costs for Counter Permits. Once the valuation is determined, you will be able to determine the overall Permit Fees for your project.
  • As the homeowner, you will also need to complete a Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit form.
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit. You then may start installation of your central air conditioner.
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they will look for during inspections and how to complete the project. 
  • Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes.

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Assisted Living Facilities, Home Day Cares & Group Homes

Home Projects

It is common to see single family residential homes used for assisted living, group home and home day care purposes. The Building Division works in conjunction with the licensing programs of the state of Colorado to ensure a safe environment for the future residents and users of these home facilities. Prior to the issuance of a state license, city staff is required to ensure that the homes occupancy classification is properly assessed to the current building code.  

Tips for doing it right:

  • Start by filling out the Day Care, Group Home & Assisted Living Facility Questionnaire. The information gathered from this questionnaire will assist our staff in determining which building requirements will be needed.
  • If a change of occupancy is required or structural modifications are needed to your home, you will need to obtain the services of a licensed contractor.  
  • A licensed contractor will submit a Permit Application and construction plans to the Building Division for review and approval prior to the start of any new work. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • To assist you in selecting a licensed contractor, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool.
  • The state of Colorado may require assisted living facilities to be equipped with a fully automatic sprinkler system, fire alarm system and handicap accessible elements. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has provider resources for assisted living residences. Contact Sean at 303-692-2914 or Aaron at 303-691-4988 with specific questions.  
  • If the state does require the installation of a fire sprinkler, fire alarm or handicap accessible elements, then a separate building permit must be obtained through the Building Division prior to any construction.
  • Home day care facilities can now be approved in Aurora for up to six children instead of the previous limit of five. Home daycare licensing information may be obtained through the Colorado Department of Human Services.
  • Licensed contractors may submit building construction plans through the Building Division office or by using the Online Permit Submittal Process. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits."
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new living space(s).    
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting the remodeling work needed for your new facility.   
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Information and forms you may need:

Live/Work Residences

Home Projects

What better place to start and grow a small business than your own home? With urban living becoming more in vogue, and with gas prices not expected to drop substantially, homeowners and developers are seeing the benefits in transforming single family homes into live/work units. 

What you will need to know:

  • The International Building Code, Section 419 defines a Live/Work Unit as a dwelling unit or sleeping unit in which a significant portion of the space includes a nonresidential use that is operated by a tenant. 
  • Although live/work units are not considered mixed occupancies and are classified as Group R-2 occupancies, residential and nonresidential uses have different requirements when it comes to accessibility.
  • According to IBC Section 1103.2.13 the portion of the live/work unit utilized for nonresidential use must be accessible, while the residential portion of the unit must be evaluated separately according to the accessibility requirements of Group R-2 occupancies.
  • Section 419 of the 2009 IBC allows for the mixing of residential and non-residential uses for one and two family dwellings (and townhouses) built under the IRC.

The limiting factors of a residential structure’s ability to be classified as a live/work unit are as follows:

  • The live/work unit is permitted to be a maximum of 3,000 square feet.
  • The nonresidential area is permitted to be a maximum 50 percent of the area of each live/work unit.
  • The nonresidential area function shall be limited to the first or main floor only of the live/work unit.
  • A maximum of five nonresidential workers or employees are allowed to occupy the nonresidential area at any one time.
  • Building occupancy is classified as an R-2.
  • Separation requirements are not required. If the unit meets the requirements of Section 419 the residential use and non-residential use portions of the unit do not need to meet the separation requirements of Section 420 and 508.
  • Group ”H” (Hazardous) or “S” (Storage) occupancies are not permitted within a live/work unit.  The non-residential portion may not be used purely for storage, but is allowed limited storage of no more than 10 percent.
  • Egress capacity is based on function.
  • Sliding doors are permitted.
  • Spiral stairways are permitted.
  • Locks are permitted.
  • Vertical openings are permitted.
  • Fire protection requirements include a monitored fire alarm system and an automatic sprinkler system. 
  • Structural requirements must meet IBC Table 1607.1.
  • Accessibility requirements must meet IBC Chapter 11. The residential portion of the structure (Group R-2) requires full accessibility for the intended use.
  • Ventilation requirements of the IMC must address the function of the space. 

Tips for doing it right:

  • To begin, contact the Office of Development Assistance to schedule a pre-application meeting. The information provided in this meeting is designed to help you understand the city of Aurora submittal requirements to obtain development approval and building permits. A project manager in Office of Development Assistance Division (ODA) can assist you in setting up this important meeting. Inquiries regarding the development process should be directed to the Office of Development Assistance (ODA) at 303-739-7345 or oda@auroragov.org
  • Buildings have various zoning requirements. Due to the complexity of zoning laws, the only accurate way to obtain the zoning requirements is to visit the Building & Zoning Code web page or call 303-739-7250. 
  • Since a change of occupancy and structural modifications are needed to your home you will need to obtain the services of a licensed contractor. 
  • A licensed contractor will submit a Permit Application, a Plot Plan and construction plans to the Building Division for review and approval prior to the start of any new work. Staff will make sure that all code requirements are addressed and plans meet current building standards.
  • To assist in finding a licensed contractor or verify that their contractors’ license is current, use the Online Contractor Look-up Tool.
  • Licensed contractors also may use the Online Permit Submittal Process to submit for a building permit. Once at the website, place your mouse on “Building and Development" to activate a drop-down menu, then click on “Online Permits." 
  • Calculate the estimated permit fee using the Online Fee Calculator based on the value of materials and labor to construct your new live/work unit.     
  • Once your permit application is approved, you will need to pay for the building permit before starting construction.
  • Contact our inspectors at any time after your permit is issued for free project consultations on what they look for during inspections and how to complete the project. Once your installation is complete, schedule a final inspection to ensure the work complies with the adopted building codes. 

Forms, applications and information you will need:

Within each category shown below you will notice words underlined, these are links to forms, applications and other interdepartmental entities that will assist you in moving your project through the development process.

Contractor vs. Do-It-Yourself

Single Family

Doing the work yourself: 

Acting as your own general contractor is a DIY option that sounds good on the surface. It seems like a great way to save lot of money on your renovation (typically 15 to 30 percent) by replacing the general contractor. How hard could it be?

Here are your responsibilities as your own general contractor:

  • Managing the details of the renovation project
  • Securing the required building permits
  • Hiring, firing and scheduling subcontractors
  • Ordering building materials and supervising installation
  • Inspecting the work of subcontractors
  • Coordinating formal building inspections (with the permit office)
  • Ensuring work is done to code
  • Troubleshooting design or logistics issues 

Home improvement handbook:

The city of Aurora has developed the "DIY and DIR: do it yourself and do it right" home improvement handbook to assist our residential homeowners in understanding the building permitting processes related to work done within the home. The information provided within the handbook will help you learn more about building safety and the role that building codes and permits play in your everyday life.

Homeowner  verification: 

In the city of Aurora, you must be the primary homeowner and currently reside in the home to pull your own building permit. Prior to issuing a building permit or accepting plans for review, you will be asked to show proof that you are the primary residence where the work is taking place. City staff will ask you to provide a driver’s license showing your current address and the deed listing you as an owner of the property. No other forms of ownership will be accepted. Copies of your deed may be available from the county assessor’s office for a small fee. If you are not the owner, then you will have to hire a licensed contractor to complete the work. A homeowner is only allowed to perform work that requires a permit on the residence they reside in. In other words, a homeowner would have to hire a contractor to perform work that requires a permit on a rental property they own, or a house they buy in order to remodel and sell.

Cost vs. liability: 

It may appear that doing the work yourself is cheaper than hiring a contractor. There are, however, certain risks involved. 

  • Property Damage. If your property or your neighbor’s property is damaged over the course of the do-it-yourself project and you have to replace property, the responsibility for repair and replacement is yours. If you use a licensed and insured contractor, the contractor’s insurance would cover any liability. You will need to verify that your contractor is licensed and insured prior to hire. 
  • Risks. There can be serious repercussions when it comes to a do-it-yourself project. The most serious of all is self-injury or injury to others. If you are dealing with projects that involve plumbing, gas and electricity without proper knowledge of what you are doing, then it’s best not to go forward with it. Leave such jobs to a professional that knows what he or she is doing and will not put your life in danger. There is no sense in risking your own life or the life of others just because you want to save a few dollars.
  • Experienced Contractor. A city of Aurora licensed contractor may be able to obtain all the necessary permits at once while a homeowner less familiar with permitting process may spend more time and effort securing the permits.
  • Inspections.  All projects requiring permits will also require inspections to ensure that the construction meets Aurora building codes. A licensed contractor is responsible for completing the project according to code. As a homeowner completing the project yourself, you could incur additional costs if portions of your project had to be redone in order to meet the building code.
  • Warranty.  Typically, contractors provide a warranty on material and labor. You will have to verify this with your contractor. 

Next steps: 

Decide what you want to do.

  • If you want to complete the project yourself, use the Single Family Home Projects page of the website and select the appropriate category from the (DIY) Single-Family Detached Residential column.
  • If you’re going to use a contractor, use the Single Family Home Projects page of the website and select the appropriate category from the (Contractor) Single-Family Detached Residential column.  
  • Read our Tips for Hiring a Contractor on this page. 

Getting permits: 

To obtain construction building permits, you may need to submit plans to the Building Division for review.

  • Types of construction work within a home vary from one project to another. By using the Single Family Home Projects page of the website, you may obtain building guides, applications and forms that provide you with information needed to secure a building permit. Once at the page, select the appropriate category of work you would like to do. 
  • If you decide to do the work yourself, Building Division staff will ask you to complete a Statement of Understanding for Homeowner’s Permit to ensure that you are aware of your responsibilities by assuming the role as your general contractor. 

Information and forms you may need:

 

 

City of Aurora Colorado -- 15151 E. Alameda Pkwy -- Aurora, CO 80012            Access Aurora: 303-739-7000